Fourth Estate Articles List



145 Articles Found


Political cartoonists are out of touch – it's time to make way for memes

As a scholar who studies social media and memetics, I wonder if political cartoons are the best way to connect with today’s diverse readership. Many crave searing, cutting political commentary – and they’re finding it in internet memes. What if internet memes were elevated – not only as a serious art form but also as an important form of editorializing that’s worthy of appearing alongside the traditional cartoon


Prescription for journalists from journalists: Less time studying Twitter, more time studying math

You hear a lot of heated claims and baseless generalities these days about what’s wrong with the news media. What’s seldom heard is what the underlying data indicate about true problem areas and where journalists need to improve.


Why restoring accuracy will help journalism win back credibility

As a journalist and a media academic, I have always assumed that I’m a fairly savvy media consumer. I know when something is genuine, and when what I’m looking at misinformation, disinformation and propaganda.


A matter of (mis)trust: why this election is posing problems for the media

Election 2019 may well prove a watershed event in more ways than one. This will likely be the first time in the country’s electoral history that more voters are following the campaign online than via conventional media – television, newspapers and radio.


How the decision to paywall NZ's largest newspaper will affect other media

This week New Zealand’s largest newspaper, the NZ Herald, launched digital subscriptions for its online content, making history at the same time. Its paywall is the first for a general newspaper in New Zealand.


‘Fake news’ is already spreading online in the election campaign – it’s up to us to stop it

We’re only days into the federal election campaign and already the first instances of “fake news” have surfaced online.


How UK journalists compare with their German counterparts – new research

The British press is regarded by the rest of the world as notoriously raucous. If you need an example of how raucous, the way British newspapers have reported Brexit is only one recent, if much-discussed, example. Headlines such as “Who will speak for England?”, “Enemies of the people” or “Draw a red line on immigration or else” stirred up controversy and put the media’s role in political and democratic debate into sharp focus.


How fake news gets into our minds, and what you can do to resist it

Although the term itself is not new, fake news presents a growing threat for societies across the world. Only a small amount of fake news is needed to disrupt a conversation, and at extremes it can have an impact on democratic processes, including elections.


Journalism's Assange problem

These days, anybody with an internet connection can be a publisher. That doesn’t make everybody a journalist. This distinction has become more important than ever in light of two recent events.


Venezuela's crisis is a tragedy - but comedy gold for satire, cartoons and memes

Thirty-nine journalists have been detained in Venezuela this year, far more than in any other Latin American country, according to the Caracas-based Institute for Press and Society. In this repressive environment, journalists are finding ways to avoid censorship and still cover the country’s crisis.