Fourth Estate Articles List



127 Articles Found


The revolving door between media and government spins again with CNN's hiring of Sarah Isgur Flores

A common practice in American journalism has, once again, sparked outrage. CNN recently announced the hiring of Sarah Isgur Flores to be “one of several editors” who will help “coordinate [political] coverage across TV and digital.


Maria Ressa: journalists need protection in Duterte’s Philippines, but we must also heed the stories they tell

There has rightly been plenty of condemnation for the arrest of journalist Maria Ressa in the Philippines on February 13. Her news organisation, Rappler – which has been critical of the government – has been targeted and maligned for at least a year by an authoritarian but sensitive regime up to its neck in human rights violations.


Brexit: journalists must now focus on policy not personalities

Seven MPs leaving the Labour party was always going to dominate the news cycle but, given that the UK currently stands to exit the EU without a deal, political journalists should be wary about getting sucked into ongoing speculation about further resignations and instead focus on the rapidly approaching cliff edge.


In Indonesia, young and old share fake news on social media

Recent research from the US shows that baby boomers or people over 65 years old with conservative political views are more likely than other age groups to share fake news through social media. Not in Indonesia. Our research, which we presented at the Asian Network for Public Opinion Research (ANPOR) annual conference in November 2018, proves otherwise. We surveyed 480 respondents from all cities and districts in West Java, Indonesia’s most populated province, to examine factors triggering people’s tendency to share fake news.


Journalism needs an audience to survive, but isn't sure how to earn its loyalty

Journalism is in the midst of an existential crisis: the profession has undergone decades of declines in readership, revenue and public trust, with no obvious end in sight. Many in the industry believe that the best way for newsrooms to recover both revenue and public trust is to improve their relationship with their audiences. News organizations once boasted huge profit margins, which left many feeling confident that they knew exactly what they needed to do in order to reach the public. As a result, journalists rarely sought feedback from their readers.


An editor and his newspaper helped build white supremacy in Georgia

In the late 19th century, Henry W. Grady, one of the South’s most prominent editors, worked closely with powerful political and business interests to build a white supremacist political economy and social order across Georgia – and the entire South – that lasted well into the 20th century. One of his primary tools was his newspaper, The Atlanta Constitution – which merged with The Atlanta Journal in 2001 to become The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.


Brexit whispers: when eavesdropping on private conversations by a journalist is ethically justified

Eavesdropping on someone else’s conversation is considered rude in polite circles. But if you are a journalist it may well result in the kind of scoop ITV News reporter Angus Walker recently chanced upon in a hotel when he overheard remarks made by the government’s chief Brexit adviser, Olly Robbins.


When newspapers close, voters become more partisan

Local newspapers are not doing as well. The past decade was brutal for the local press, and the numbers behind the collapse of local newspapers are staggering.


How metrics are changing editorial decisions in African newsrooms

New digital technologies such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and WhatsApp have significantly shaped news production, distribution and consumption practices around the world. This has led to changes in the ways in which news is gathered by citizens and professional journalists as well as the ways in which it’s consumed.


Why Jamal Khashoggi's murder took place in a consulate

Journalist Jamal Khashoggi was brutally murdered by an alleged Saudi “hit squad” whose members have close ties to Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman. I believe that despite massive amounts of press attention, two important and related elements of Khashoggi’s murder remain underexamined. First is the fact that his murder allegedly took place within a consulate or embassy, a global borderland. Second is the fact that his alleged murderers included people traveling on diplomatic passports, who were not entirely subject to the laws of the state – Turkey – they were visiting.