Fourth Estate Articles List



94 Articles Found


Here's a 1918 role model for Sarah Sanders' successor as White House press secretary

Stephanie Grisham, communications director for Melania Trump, will replace Sarah Huckabee Sanders as White House press secretary. Sanders’ controversial tenure will end June 30. At a time when the office of White House press secretary is the focus of controversy, we believe the first person to hold the position, journalist Ray Stannard Baker, could be a role model for Grisham and future press secretaries.


How much power can an image actually wield? (Warning - Graphic Image)

When the Associated Press published Julia Le Duc’s photograph of a drowned Salvadoran man, Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez, and his 23-month old daughter Valeria, it sparked outrage on social media. According to Le Duc, Ramírez had attempted to cross the Rio Grande after realizing he couldn’t present himself to U.S. authorities to request asylum. But beyond raising awareness via Twitter and Facebook feeds, does an image like this one have the power to sway public opinion or spur politicians to take action?


Accountability in Kenya's media still needs attention. What can be done

In Kenya, there’s growing debate about media accountability – that the media should act in the interests of the public good, and that it’s accurate, free and fair. Most of the debate has focused on the lack of quality journalism and a decline in journalistic ethics.


Climate change or climate crisis? To really engage people, the media should talk about solutions

Days after the British parliament declared a “climate emergency”, The Guardian announced that it would start using “stronger” language to discuss the environment. Its updated style guide states that “climate change” no longer accurately reflects the seriousness of the situation and journalists are advised to use “climate emergency”, “climate crisis” or “climate breakdown” instead.


How the New York media covered the Stonewall riots

The Stonewall riots were a six-night series of protests that began in the early morning of June 28, 1969, and centered around the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York City. For six nights, protesters clashed off and on with police, while chanting and marching in and around Christopher Street. In the days after the Stonewall riots, depending on which paper you read, you would have been exposed to a vastly different version of events. The major dailies gave a megaphone to the police, while alternative outlets embedded themselves among the protesters.


Increasing open access publications serves publishers' commercial interests

Research and discoveries need to be shared. And when those discoveries are publicly funded, they should be openly accessible. Academic journals are the main forum researchers use to share new discoveries with other researchers, particularly in the sciences. For most academic journals, university libraries pay subscription fees on behalf of students and researchers. But, over the past 20 years, there has been a push to make journals freely available to anyone with an internet connection. In response, research funders have announced open access policies in the United States, Canada, Australia, South America and Europe.


ABC and Trump

It has been interesting, as an outsider currently in the US, to see some of the key issues that have emerged in the wake of the ABC network's 30 hours with Trump. From beginning to end, it has highlighted how far we the media still have to go if we want to be respected and trusted in holding powerful public figures to account.


The New York Times ends daily political cartoons, but it's not the death of the art form

The writing has been on the wall for at least a decade. The hallowed cartooning traditions of the 20th century cannot continue without facing up to fundamental changes in the industry. Although the New York Times decision doesn’t spell the end of cartooning as we know it, this may very well be a tipping point for the global cartooning industry.


A tribute to Raymond Louw: a great South African editor and determined activist

There are dictators and autocrats who are breathing a little easier today. The intolerant, the narrow-minded, the scared, the defensive, the haters of freedom and particularly freedom of speech, are watching us lay to rest the man who never left them alone.


Naming and shaming’ juvenile offenders or open justice? A new battle over press freedom

The debate centres on a bill that would introduce Australia's most restrictive rules on reporting on juvenile offenders, including punishments of up to a year in jail for journalists who enter a juvenile court or publish details of any case.