Fourth Estate Articles List



140 Articles Found


We can put a leash on Google and Facebook, but there's no saving the traditional news model

How technology companies make money is a good question for digital media users of any age. It lies at the heart of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s inquiry into the power and profits of Google and Facebook, the world’s two most ubiquitous digital platforms.


Ghana's constitution is meant to protect the media: but does it?

Between 1957 – the year Ghana won independence from British – and 1992 the country had three civilian heads of state interspersed with several military rulers. But that year it finally embraced democratic rule and adopted a constitution. One of the areas of protection the new constitution offered was the independence of the media and of expression. But are these enforced? And has the media felt their positive impact?


Every Journalist's Worst Nightmare

A huge story of abuse, murder and exploitation, involving senior figures in the establishment. A confirmed police investigation into allegations the authorities describe as 'credible and true'. Lives and reputations are at stake, the headlines are lurid and compelling. But what if it isn't true?


The Mueller hearing and the death of facts

Founding Father John Adams once said, “Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.” But this is no longer Adams’ America, where facts were unalterable.


Media watchdog's report into Christchurch shootings goes soft on showing violent footage

Coverage of the Christchurch terrorism by Australia’s television channels raised “serious questions” about whether they had breached the television codes of practice, according to the broadcasting regulator, the Australian Communication and Media Authority (ACMA). However, it has declined to make specific findings that the codes were in fact breached. Instead, it proposes to discuss with the television industry whether the codes are adequately framed to deal with the kind of material generated by the atrocity, especially the footage from the terrorist’s bodycam.


Media Files: Washington Post weather editor Jason Samenow on how weather coverage is evolving – and building audience growth

When he founded the blog CapitalWeather.com 15 years ago in Washington DC, Jason Samenow was working for the US government as a climate change analyst. A full-time media career was probably the last thing on his mind.


Traitors and Journalists

Too often, journalists find themselves accused of being traitors when they file difficult and controversial stories about their country, stories that can lead to embarrassment, disgrace and even short term damage to national reputations. But the truth is their work can make a democracy stronger, not weaker, proved they go about their business in a careful and ethical manner.


Governments are making fake news a crime – but it could stifle free speech

To stem the rising influence of fake news, some countries have made the creation and distribution of deliberately false information a crime.


Wimbledon: The Johanna Konta interview and the problems with viewing sports stars as public figures

After her loss to Barbora Strycova in the Wimbledon quarter finals, British tennis player Johanna Konta reacted somewhat angrily to a line of questioning from a journalist that appeared to hold her to account for her loss. The fallout and public reaction to this press conference, while predominantly in support of the athlete, raises questions about the wider context of sports journalism.


Defending Media Freedom: Who's Up For The Fight?

In London this week, Governments, media and the non-profit sector gathered to make bold plans and issue bold statements about how to defend media freedom against growing attacks around the world. However, as interesting as the promises and speeches were, what was more interesting was the things left unsaid, and the identity of those who were absent from the discussions.